Saturday, January 16, 2010

Seeing through rather than looking at

Perhaps one reason for the absence of genuine debate among those who disagree about fundamental principles is simply an unwillingness to believe that there is such a thing as being right or wrong. Skepticism is replaced by cynicism. Michael Roth writes about the effect of "critical thinking" in humanities education and on society:
.... A common way to show that one has sharpened one's critical thinking is to display an ability to see through or undermine statements made by (or beliefs held by) others. Thus, our best students are really good at one aspect of critical thinking­—being critical. For many students today, being smart means being critical. ....

The skill at unmasking error, or simple intellectual one-upmanship, is not completely without value, but we should be wary of creating a class of self-satisfied debunkers or, to use a currently fashionable word on campuses, people who like to "trouble" ideas. In overdeveloping the capacity to show how texts, institutions, or people fail to accomplish what they set out to do, we may be depriving students of the capacity to learn as much as possible from what they study. In a humanities culture in which being smart often means being a critical unmasker, our students may become too good at showing how things don't make sense. ....

.... We no longer have the courage of our lack of conviction. .... To declare that one wanted to disprove a view would show too much faith in the ability to tell truth from falsehood. And to declare that one was receptive to learning from someone else's view would show too much openness to being persuaded by an idea that might soon be deconstructed (or simply mocked).

.... The confident refusal to be affected by those with whom we disagree seems to have infected much of our cultural life: from politics to the press, from siloed academic programs (no matter how multidisciplinary) to warring public intellectuals. .... [more]
Beyond Critical Thinking - The Chronicle Review - The Chronicle of Higher Education