Monday, September 28, 2015

The duty to die

.... I met Karner and interacted with her in my work opposing assisted suicide. She said—and I have spoken to many other terminally ill and disabled people who agree—that the assisted suicide movement made it more difficult for her to live with cancer. Here’s how she put it in the Hartford Courant in opposing an assisted suicide legalization proposal:
The out-of-state proponents of the bill regarding physician-assisted suicide suggest having the ability to end your life legally is comforting. But I can tell you from personal experience that it is nearly as troubling as the cancer itself.

You see, I get strength and comfort from the knowledge that nobody is going to give up on me — medically, psychologically or holistically. Right now, I have the firm support of the state and my fellow citizens in my desire to live — no matter the cost or burden.

If that were to change, the tiny knowledge that I might be straining my family, friends, doctors or community resources unnecessarily would be a heavy burden. The constant “option” for suicide would wear at my resolve and I fear, become an unspoken “duty” for me and others.
Sadly, and tellingly, the Maggie Karners of the world, who strive courageously against terminal disease to the end, are mostly ignored in the media’s great rush to boost assisted suicide. ....