Thursday, January 3, 2019

The curious incident

I've been browsing in the "Quotations" section of Michael and Mollie Hardwick's The Sherlock Holmes Companion (1962), from which:
"Which is it today," I asked, "morphine or cocaine?"
He raised his eyes languidly from the old black-letter volume which he had opened.
"It is cocaine," he said, "a seven-per--cent solution. Would you care to try it?"
"May I ask whether you have any professional inquiry on foot at present?"
"None. Hence the cocaine. I cannot live without brain-work. What else is there to live for? Stand at the window here. Was ever such a dreary, dismal, unprofitable world? See how the yellow fog swirls down the street and drifts across the dun-coloured houses. What could be more hopelessly prosaic and material? What is the use of having powers, doctor, when one has no field upon which to exert them?" The Sign of Four.
And later:
For years I had gradually weaned him from that drug mania which had threatened once to check his remarkable career. Now I knew that under ordinary conditions he no longer craved for this artificial stimulus; but I was well aware that the fiend was not dead, but sleeping... The Missing Three-quarter.
And two of the most famous:
"It is an old maxim of mine that when you have excluded the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth." The Beryl Coronet.

Inspector Gregory: "Is there any other point to which you would wish to draw my attention?"
Holmes: "To the curious incident of the dog in the night-time."
Inspector Gregory: "The dog did nothing in the night-time."
Holmes: "That was the curious incident." Silver Blaze.